kateoplis:

Diamond Nights, Beth Moon

Posted at 8:45am.

scanzen:

lvnte:

Nincs hozza fotos es datum, de szerintem ez a kep kamu, nem?

forrás: http://photopolygon.com/russian-reporter/details/13453 (25/11/2009) a feltöltő szerint egy 10*15-ös fotó lett beszkennelve, amit egy gyerekkori barátjától kapott, a képen egy szovjet határőr látható 1975-ben egy anyamedvével, aki odaszokott az őrhelyéhez és rendszeresen megdézsmálta a sűrített tejes készletet

A képet posztoló ezeket írja:

This picture gave me a friend. Author and her childhood friend. But his position is lost. Hungry Bear and border guards fed condensed milk. Bear paw squeezing the milk out of the can, drink, and then fed the bears.

This image only I had more than 13 years. This is a small picture size 10x15. I just scanned it and slightly retouched. Friend who gave me this picture for the collection said she sent this picture of her friend from the army, and that they simply went there to visit the bears … What has bought, for sale … But it is not mounting … Something he was hungry then. 

Unfortunately, I do not know the author’s name. The familiar 11 years ago has died. But according to my assumptions it was in 1975

Spent the day looking for the author. Author Batsuev Alex. He worked in a photo-studio Pevekskoy in 1970-80 years. In 1993, he died. His son has not yet responded to my letter. These photos are sold in the local CCD. Now it is clear why in a few places there was this picture, including me. In the photo bear Masha. Photo taken by Schmidt or Ryrkayti. And Masha lived on Cape Weber. Feeding condensed milk and kissing cubs hunter Ryrkaytiyskogo with / for “Pioneer” Mogulyak Nicholas, born in 1948. He, thank God alive. Another fishing habitually hands. According to his son, he had three Masha in different years. The history of photography is almost finished. If the answer is the son of the photographer, I’ll let you know on this site.

egy kommentelő:

Snapshot is really real, and also made about this time. The fact that I lived in Chukotka and in our family album is a snapshot. My father knew the man in the photo, in my name it was Machulyak can of course I am wrong. We lived in the village is 180 Ryrkaypy meridian on against Wrangel Island. And these events were not a novelty. Personally threw cans with condensed milk. The kids loved it! Mikshka men, tore up less frequently but the cases were not one-off. Going to a lot of people to take a look, after the animal began to get nervous, and throw on the onlookers poyavlelsya man with a gun (or a huntsman policeman) shot at the top and the bear ran away!

Posted at 8:45am.

scanzen:

lvnte:


Nincs hozza fotos es datum, de szerintem ez a kep kamu, nem?


forrás: http://photopolygon.com/russian-reporter/details/13453 (25/11/2009) a feltöltő szerint egy 10*15-ös fotó lett beszkennelve, amit egy gyerekkori barátjától kapott, a képen egy szovjet határőr látható 1975-ben egy anyamedvével, aki odaszokott az őrhelyéhez és rendszeresen megdézsmálta a sűrített tejes készletet
A képet posztoló ezeket írja:
This picture gave me a friend. Author and her childhood friend. But his position is lost. Hungry Bear and border guards fed condensed milk. Bear paw squeezing the milk out of the can, drink, and then fed the bears.
This image only I had more than 13 years. This is a small picture size 10x15. I just scanned it and slightly retouched. Friend who gave me this picture for the collection said she sent this picture of her friend from the army, and that they simply went there to visit the bears … What has bought, for sale … But it is not mounting … Something he was hungry then. 
Unfortunately, I do not know the author’s name. The familiar 11 years ago has died. But according to my assumptions it was in 1975
Spent the day looking for the author. Author Batsuev Alex. He worked in a photo-studio Pevekskoy in 1970-80 years. In 1993, he died. His son has not yet responded to my letter. These photos are sold in the local CCD. Now it is clear why in a few places there was this picture, including me. In the photo bear Masha. Photo taken by Schmidt or Ryrkayti. And Masha lived on Cape Weber. Feeding condensed milk and kissing cubs hunter Ryrkaytiyskogo with / for “Pioneer” Mogulyak Nicholas, born in 1948. He, thank God alive. Another fishing habitually hands. According to his son, he had three Masha in different years. The history of photography is almost finished. If the answer is the son of the photographer, I’ll let you know on this site.
egy kommentelő:
Snapshot is really real, and also made about this time. The fact that I lived in Chukotka and in our family album is a snapshot. My father knew the man in the photo, in my name it was Machulyak can of course I am wrong. We lived in the village is 180 Ryrkaypy meridian on against Wrangel Island. And these events were not a novelty. Personally threw cans with condensed milk. The kids loved it! Mikshka men, tore up less frequently but the cases were not one-off. Going to a lot of people to take a look, after the animal began to get nervous, and throw on the onlookers poyavlelsya man with a gun (or a huntsman policeman) shot at the top and the bear ran away!

grofjardanhazy:

fortunecookied:

Soviet Space Dog Laika Cigarette Pack
Russia
1950s

Laika!!

And here’s the video commercial of the brand from 1957.

Posted at 8:45am.

grofjardanhazy:

fortunecookied:

Soviet Space Dog Laika Cigarette Pack Russia 1950s

Laika!!
And here’s the video commercial of the brand from 1957.
Salvador Dali, Summer.

Gentlemen, take note.

(Source: thegreatage)

Posted at 8:45am.


Salvador Dali, Summer.


Gentlemen, take note.

thirdeyesviews:

malformalady:

White peacocks fighting for dominancy

History 101

Posted at 1:30pm.

thirdeyesviews:

malformalady:

White peacocks fighting for dominancy

History 101

youmightfindyourself:

You are introduced to someone at a conference. They look nice and you have a brief chat about the theme of the keynote speaker. But already, partly because of the slope of their neck and a lilt in their accent, you have reached an overwhelming conclusion. Or, you sit down in the carriage – and there, diagonally opposite you – is someone you cannot stop looking at for the rest of a journey across miles of darkening countryside. You know nothing concrete about them. You are going only by what their appearance suggests. You note that they have slipped a finger into a book (The Food of the Middle East), that their nails are bitten raw, that they have a thin leather strap around their left wrist and that they are squinting a touch short-sightedly at the map above the door. And that is enough to convince you. Another day, coming out of the supermarket, amidst a throng of people, you catch sight of a face for no longer than eight seconds and yet here too, you feel the same overwhelming certainty – and, subsequently, a bittersweet sadness at their disappearance in the anonymous crowd.

Crushes: they happen to some people often and to almost everyone sometimes. Airports, trains, streets, conferences – the dynamics of modern life are forever throwing us into fleeting contact with strangers, from amongst whom we pick out a few examples who seem to us not merely interesting, but more powerfully, the solution to our lives. This phenomenon – the crush – goes to the heart of the modern understanding of love. It could seem like a small incident, essentially comic and occasionally farcical. It may look like a minor planet in the constellation of love, but it is in fact the underlying secret central sun around which our notions of the romantic revolve.

A crush represents in pure and perfect form the dynamics of romantic philosophy: the explosive interaction of limited knowledge, outward obstacles to further discovery – and boundless hope.

The crush reveals how willing we are to allow details to suggest a whole. We allow the arch of someone’s eyebrow to suggest a personality. We take the way a person puts more weight on their right leg as they stand listening to a colleague as an indication of a witty independence of mind. Or their way of lowering their head seems proof of a complex shyness and sensitivity. From a few cues only, you anticipate years of happiness, buoyed by profound mutual sympathy. They will fully grasp that you love your mother even though you don’t get on well with her; that you are hard-working, even though you appear to be distracted; that you are hurt rather than angry. The parts of your character that confuse and puzzle others will at last find a soothing, wise, complex soulmate.

The answer to life

In elaborating a whole personality from a few small – but hugely evocative – details, we are doing for the inner character of a person what our eyes naturally do with the sketch of a face.

We don’t see this as a picture of someone who has no nostrils, eight strands of hair and no eyelashes. Without even noticing that we are doing it, we fill in the missing parts. Our brains are primed to take tiny visual hints and construct entire figures from them – and we do the same when it comes to character. We are – much more than we give ourselves credit for – inveterate artists of elaboration. We have evolved to be ready to make quick decisions about people (to trust or withhold, to fight or embrace, to share or deny) on the basis of very limited evidence – the way someone looks at us, how they stand, a twitch of the lips, a slight movement of the shoulder – and we bring this ingenious but fateful talent to situations of love as much to those of danger.

The cynical voice wants to declare that these enthusiastic imaginings at the conference or on the train, in the street or in the supermarket, are just delusional; that we simply project a false, completely imaginary idea of identity onto an innocent stranger. But this is too sweeping. We may be right. The wry posture may really belong to someone with a great line in scepticism; the head tilter may be unusually generous to the foibles of others. The error of the crush is more subtle, it lies in how easily we move from spotting a range of genuinely fine traits of character to settling on a recklessly naive romantic conclusion: that the other across the train aisle or pavement constitutes a complete answer to our inner needs.

The primary error of the crush lies in overlooking a central fact about people in general, not merely this or that example, but the species as a whole: that everyone has something very substantially wrong with them once their characters are fully known, something so wrong as to make an eventual mockery of the unlimited rapture unleashed by the crush. We can’t yet know what the problems will be, but we can and should be certain that they are there, lurking somewhere behind the facade, waiting for time to unfurl them.

How can one be so sure? Because the facts of life have deformed all of our natures. No one among us has come through unscathed. There is too much to fear: mortality, loss, dependency, abandonment, ruin, humiliation, subjection. We are, all of us, desperately fragile, ill-equipped to meet with the challenges to our mental integrity: we lack courage, preparation, confidence, intelligence. We don’t have the right role models, we were (necessarily) imperfectly parented, we fight rather than explain, we nag rather than teach, we fret instead of analysing our worries, we have a precarious sense of security, we can’t understand either ourselves or others well enough, we don’t have an appetite for the truth and suffer a fatal weakness for flattering denials. The chances of a perfectly good human emerging from the perilous facts of life are non-existent. Our fears and our frailties play themselves out in a thousand ways, they can make us defensive or aggressive, grandiose or hesitant, clingy or avoidant – but we can be sure that they will make everyone much less than perfect and at moments, extremely hard to live with.

We don’t have to know someone in any way before knowing this about them. Naturally, their particular way of being flawed and (consequently very annoying) will not be visually apparent and may be concealed for quite long periods. If we only encounter another person in a fairly limited range of situations (a train journey, rather than when they are trying to get a toddler into a car seat; a conference, rather than 87 minutes into a shopping trip with their elderly father) we may, for a very long time indeed (especially if we are left alone to convert our enthusiasm into an obsession because they don’t call us back or are playing it cool), have the pleasure of believing we have landed upon an angel.

A mature person thinks, not, ‘There’s nothing good here’, but rather ‘The genuinely good things will – inevitably – come mixed up with really terrible things’

Maturity doesn’t suggest we give up on crushes. Merely that we definitively give up on the founding romantic idea upon which the Western understanding of relationships and marriage has been based for the past 250 years: that a perfect being exists who can solve all our needs and satisfy our yearnings. We need to swap the Romantic view for the Tragic Awareness of Love, which states that every human can be guaranteed to frustrate, anger, annoy, madden and disappoint us – and we will (without any malice) do the same to them. There can be no end to our sense of emptiness and incompleteness. This is a truth chiselled indelibly into the script of life. Choosing who to marry or commit ourselves to is therefore merely a case of identifying which particular variety of suffering we would most like to sacrifice ourselves for, rather than an occasion miraculously to escape from grief.

We should enjoy our crushes. A crush teaches us about qualities we admire and need to have more of in our lives. The person on the train really does have an extremely beguiling air of self-deprecation in their eyes. The person glimpsed by the fresh fruit counter really does promise to be a gentle and excellent parent. But these characters will, just as importantly, also be sure to ruin our lives in key ways, as all those we love will.

A caustic view of crushes shouldn’t depress us, merely relieve the excessive imaginative pressure that our romantic culture places upon long-term relationships. The failure of one particular partner to be the ideal Other is not – we should always understand – an argument against them; it is by no means a sign that the relationship deserves to fail or be upgraded. We have all necessarily, without being damned, ended up with that figure of our nightmares, ‘the wrong person.’

Romantic pessimism simply takes it for granted that one person should not be asked to be everything to another. With this truth accepted, we can look for ways to accommodate ourselves as gently and as kindly as we can to the awkward realities of life beside another fallen creature, for example, never feeling that we have to spend all of our time with them, being prepared for the disappointments of erotic life, not insisting on complete transparency, being ready to be maddened and to madden, making sure we are allowed to keep a vibrant independent social life and maintaining a clear-eyed refusal to act on sudden desires to run off with strangers on trains… A mature understanding of the madness of crushes turns out to be the best and perhaps the only solution to the tensions of long-term love.

Posted at 1:30pm.

regardintemporel:

Jean Cocteau - Light painting, 1950

Posted at 8:45am.

staceythinx:

The Space Race by Justin Van Genderen is a series of posters inspired by the vintage design work that came from both sides of the competition.

(Source: pinterest.com)

Posted at 6:15pm.

books0977:

Model reading in tree. Spring/summer Harper’s Bazaar fashion image, July 1953. Photograph by Richard Avedon.

Avedon did not conform to the standard technique of taking studio fashion photographs, where models stood emotionless and seemingly indifferent to the camera. Instead, Avedon showed models full of emotion, smiling, laughing, and, many times, in action in outdoor settings which was revolutionary at the time.

Posted at 8:45am and tagged with: photography,.

books0977:

Model reading in tree. Spring/summer Harper’s Bazaar fashion image, July 1953. Photograph by Richard Avedon.
Avedon did not conform to the standard technique of taking studio fashion photographs, where models stood emotionless and seemingly indifferent to the camera. Instead, Avedon showed models full of emotion, smiling, laughing, and, many times, in action in outdoor settings which was revolutionary at the time.

Frederick Douglass, The Meaning of July Fourth to the Negro, July 5, 1852.

Again, this was part a speech given to a group of the elite of the nation by a freed Black man.

In pre-Civil War America.

And said out loud. To people.

Stones, man.

(via thoughtnami)

I have a pet theory that our general facility with the English language has been in gradual decline since 1900.

Posted at 6:15pm.

What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer; a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciation of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade and solemnity, are, to him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy-a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of the United States, at this very hour.

July 4th 2014

Reblogged from the-rx|24 notes |#

Kate Bush from ‘50 Words for Snow’ (from the album of the same title released in 2011)

(Source: gravellyrun)

Posted at 6:13pm.

drifting, twisting, whiteout, blackbird braille, Wenceslasaire, avalanche, swans-a-melting, deamondi-pavlova, eiderfalls, Santanyeroofdikov, stellatundra, hunter’s dream, faloop’njoompoola, zebranivem, spangladasha, albadune, hironocrashka, hooded-wept, phlegm de neige, mountainsob, anklebreaker, erase-o-dust, shnamistoflopp’n, terrablizza, whirlissimo, vanilla swarm, icyskidski, robber’s veil, creaky-creaky, psycho hail, whippoccino, shimmer glisten, Zhivagodamarbletash, sorbet deluge, sleetspoot’n, melt-o-blast, slipperella, boomerangablanca, groundberry down, meringuerpeaks, crème-bouffant, peDtaH ‘ej chIS qo’, deep’nhidden, bad for trains, shovelcrusted, anechoic, blown from polar fur, vanishing world mistral despair, snow

retronauthq:

1962: Slaughterhouse chandelier

Cattle walking the last mile to this slaughterhouse are treated to this dazzling, but incongruous display of light before the end in Gross-Umstadt near Darmstadt, West Germany, on November 29, 1962. The chandelier came from a nearby factory that did not have room to assemble it there, so they decided to assemble it in this slaughterhouse.

Source

Posted at 8:45am and tagged with: photography, unexpected,.

retronauthq:

1962: Slaughterhouse chandelier
Cattle walking the last mile to this slaughterhouse are treated to this dazzling, but incongruous display of light before the end in Gross-Umstadt near Darmstadt, West Germany, on November 29, 1962. The chandelier came from a nearby factory that did not have room to assemble it there, so they decided to assemble it in this slaughterhouse.
Source

estufar

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

Posted at 8:45am.


estufar

An actual headline from The New York Times in 1919 

doomhamster:

belcanta:

nikkidubs:

attentiondeficitaptitude:

belcanta:

Guaranteed basic income to every citizen, whether or not they are employed to ensure their survival and that they live in a dignified, humane way, preventing poverty, illness, homelessness, reducing crime, encouraging higher education and learning vocations as well as helping society become more prosperous as a whole. 

Wow. Forget raising the minimum wage. This is much much better idea.

The minimum wage could actually drop if we had basic income.

But Americans would never go for it. Miserably slogging through 12 hour days and having businesses open 24/7 is too engrained in our culture.

"BUT WHERE WILL THE GOVERNMENT GET THE MONEY?" screamed Joe Schmoe, slamming a meaty fist onto the table and getting mouth-froth all over the front of his greying tank top. "You libt*rds all think money grows on TREES!! HAHA!"

"But where will people get the incentive to work?!" Mindy Bindy cried, flapping her hands in front of her face. She’d had a fear of the unemployed lollygagging about ever since she was a child and her mother told her to be afraid of the unemployed lollygagging about. "You think people should get paid for nothing? I work hard for my money!”

"But who will serve me?" grumbled Marty McMoneybags. "Who will make me feel important? Who will do my laundry and cook my food and stand in front of me wearing a plastic smile while I take out all my stress—because I do have a lot of stress, you know, being this rich is stressful—on them?” He paused and straightened out the piles of hundred dollar bills on the desk in front of him, then raised his two watery, outraged eyes up to the Heavens. “Lord, if there are no poor people, how will I know that I’m rich??”

I laughed. This is perfect! Well said!

The thing is, while I’m sure you could scrape up a few people who’d be willing to just float by on a guaranteed minimum income? For most people the choice to work would be a no-brainer. “Hmmm. I can get by on 33k a year, or I can take that part time job and make 48k… enough to move to a better apartment, maybe take the family on vacation. Sold.” Hell, most people would want to work simply because it gives one a sense of dignity and something to do with one’s time. (Speaking as someone who’s been unemployed, on extended sick leave, etc. in her time, the boredom and sense of isolation that comes with not having a job is almost as bad as the humiliation of having to depend on other people for one’s survival.)

And with this system, part-time jobs and “non-skilled” jobs would be much more readily available because nobody would need to work two or three jobs just to stay afloat!

Which would ALSO mean that employers and customers couldn’t shamelessly exploit employees the way they can today, because if losing a job weren’t necessarily a financial disaster, more people would be willing to walk out on jobs where they weren’t being treated with dignity.

And if this also applies to students (and it should) then student loans would become much less of a problem, and fewer people would flunk out of school because of having to juggle studies and work.

Far fewer people would be forced to stay with abusive partners, parents or roommates because they couldn’t afford to move out.

And the thing is, all those people who suddenly had money? They’d be spending it. They’d be getting all the stuff they can’t afford now - new clothes, books, toys, locally-produced food, car repairs - and with each purchase money would flow BACK to the government, because VAT, also income tax.

The unemployed and/or disabled wouldn’t need special support any more - which would also mean the government could fire however many admins who are currently engaged in humiliating - *cough* making sure those people aren’t getting money they don’t deserve. Same for medical benefits and pensions. And I’m no legal scholar, but I somehow imagine less financial desperation would lead to less petty crime, and hence less need for police and security everywhere?

TL;DR Doomie thinks this is a good idea, laughs at those who protest.

Amen. Extreme inequality and the creation of underclasses is bound to lead to all manner of inefficiencies in order to maintain the status quo. This plan, if it is acted upon, may well become model for advanced economies globally.

Posted at 1:30pm and tagged with: economics, politics,.

doomhamster:

belcanta:

nikkidubs:

attentiondeficitaptitude:

belcanta:

Guaranteed basic income to every citizen, whether or not they are employed to ensure their survival and that they live in a dignified, humane way, preventing poverty, illness, homelessness, reducing crime, encouraging higher education and learning vocations as well as helping society become more prosperous as a whole. 

Wow. Forget raising the minimum wage. This is much much better idea.
The minimum wage could actually drop if we had basic income.
But Americans would never go for it. Miserably slogging through 12 hour days and having businesses open 24/7 is too engrained in our culture.

"BUT WHERE WILL THE GOVERNMENT GET THE MONEY?" screamed Joe Schmoe, slamming a meaty fist onto the table and getting mouth-froth all over the front of his greying tank top. "You libt*rds all think money grows on TREES!! HAHA!""But where will people get the incentive to work?!" Mindy Bindy cried, flapping her hands in front of her face. She’d had a fear of the unemployed lollygagging about ever since she was a child and her mother told her to be afraid of the unemployed lollygagging about. "You think people should get paid for nothing? I work hard for my money!”
"But who will serve me?" grumbled Marty McMoneybags. "Who will make me feel important? Who will do my laundry and cook my food and stand in front of me wearing a plastic smile while I take out all my stress—because I do have a lot of stress, you know, being this rich is stressful—on them?” He paused and straightened out the piles of hundred dollar bills on the desk in front of him, then raised his two watery, outraged eyes up to the Heavens. “Lord, if there are no poor people, how will I know that I’m rich??”

I laughed. This is perfect! Well said!

The thing is, while I’m sure you could scrape up a few people who’d be willing to just float by on a guaranteed minimum income? For most people the choice to work would be a no-brainer. “Hmmm. I can get by on 33k a year, or I can take that part time job and make 48k… enough to move to a better apartment, maybe take the family on vacation. Sold.” Hell, most people would want to work simply because it gives one a sense of dignity and something to do with one’s time. (Speaking as someone who’s been unemployed, on extended sick leave, etc. in her time, the boredom and sense of isolation that comes with not having a job is almost as bad as the humiliation of having to depend on other people for one’s survival.)
And with this system, part-time jobs and “non-skilled” jobs would be much more readily available because nobody would need to work two or three jobs just to stay afloat!
Which would ALSO mean that employers and customers couldn’t shamelessly exploit employees the way they can today, because if losing a job weren’t necessarily a financial disaster, more people would be willing to walk out on jobs where they weren’t being treated with dignity.
And if this also applies to students (and it should) then student loans would become much less of a problem, and fewer people would flunk out of school because of having to juggle studies and work.
Far fewer people would be forced to stay with abusive partners, parents or roommates because they couldn’t afford to move out.
And the thing is, all those people who suddenly had money? They’d be spending it. They’d be getting all the stuff they can’t afford now - new clothes, books, toys, locally-produced food, car repairs - and with each purchase money would flow BACK to the government, because VAT, also income tax.
The unemployed and/or disabled wouldn’t need special support any more - which would also mean the government could fire however many admins who are currently engaged in humiliating - *cough* making sure those people aren’t getting money they don’t deserve. Same for medical benefits and pensions. And I’m no legal scholar, but I somehow imagine less financial desperation would lead to less petty crime, and hence less need for police and security everywhere?
TL;DR Doomie thinks this is a good idea, laughs at those who protest.

Amen. Extreme inequality and the creation of underclasses is bound to lead to all manner of inefficiencies in order to maintain the status quo. This plan, if it is acted upon, may well become model for advanced economies globally.